How to Find Mentors: My 5 Minute Rule

Mentors have been a key part of building my brand and my business. I just wouldn’t be where I am without them. Before I dive into how to find a mentor, I want to clarify what mentorship means to me.

I think some people believe that a mentor is someone who meets with you regularly and advises you on all the major decisions you’re making. I have some of these formal mentors, however, I also have several people in my rolodex that I consider to be mentors even though our relationship is less formal. These may be people I check in with every few months to ask a few questions to. These are informal mentors, but just as important for long term success.

I just wanted to clear that up because I hear so many people say “I need a mentor” when they may already have a handful of people who do act as informal mentors. Not everyone has a mentor they meet with every Friday morning for breakfast, and that’s okay. Mentorship is so much more than that! The key thing is to have a few people you can turn to when you need a bit of help, or you’re making a decision that could use some expert advice.

Okay, onto today’s episode of She Takes on the World TV! In this episode I’m sharing the technique I’ve used to find the mentors I currently work with. I call it my “5 minute rule” and it has also helped me get the attention of celebrity entrepreneurs.

After you watch the episode, I’d love to hear how you find mentors or get expert advice in a comment below.

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13 thoughts on “How to Find Mentors: My 5 Minute Rule

  1. I love the 5 minute rule: keeping it short is key.

    When I owned my retail store & yoga studio I was constantly asked for freebies, interviews, advice and it got a little draining after a while. Approaching potential mentors with an attitude of wanting to be of service is a great way to start; instead of asking + getting you are offering…

    1. Totally agree Caroline and I hear you on feeling drained when people are always asking you for help. At least a dozen people a week ask me to “go for a quick coffee” which is never quick, so I’ve had to create a personal policy that I just can’t do that anymore. For awhile I felt bad saying no because I love to help people but I also feel I can help people just as much in 5 minutes because they keep their questions really focused on what they need advice on the most.

  2. Very interesting Natalie! Speaking of, I was wondering if you could give me 5 minutes to answer 3 simple questions? … Just kidding!! 🙂

  3. That’s a wonderful technique, Natalie! I agree that reaching out to people we want to have in our lives, even if we don’t know them yet, and nurturing those relationships is the key to a rapid quality growth (either business or personal).

    I tend to send an introductory e-mail, something short and sweet, and finish it with a simple question, not necessarily business related. I am just looking for something to establish initial rapport with that person and take it from there.

    The key, of course, is follow up and keeping in touch… Which I failed to do after I interviewed you for the e-course on delegation back in November last year. The interview got great feedback and your book got accolades–I ordered a copy for each participant as a bonus (I myself go back to it every time I feel stuck!). But with the launch and then teaching the course my follow up with you never got onto my calendar… I do apologize!

    You are an inspiration! And I am happy I have this opportunity to give you the credit.

    Thank you 🙂

  4. I love this Natalie. I’m in the midst of putting together a new membership site and community and really needed the advise of some big guns in my industry. They were both willing to give of their time but i felt like i definatley was taking advantage of their very busy lives. having something to offer, like a spot on the site, or….an opportunity to speak and make an offer on a webinar i’m hosting would be a great gesture of thanks, especially since i violated the 5 minute rule!

  5. I’ve learned this big time + even with all of those lessons learned I still needed this reminder for something I’ve been thinking about asking:)! Thank you Natalie!

  6. I was recently turned down for an informational interview because the person unfortunately didn’t have enough time. She was nice enough to refer me to a colleague. I wish I’d watched this video sooner! I honestly only needed a few minutes of her time and informational interview definitely wasn’t the best term to use. I think that 5 minutes is fair and it challenges you to think of great questions. I’ll use this technique moving forward.

    For someone who isn’t well established yet and who doesn’t have a blog. What are some things that they can offer?

    Thanks for sharing, Natalie!

  7. I absolutely LOVE this!!

    Helping people get the attention of “big guns”, in order to collaborate with or just get some help from them is what I do.
    I already encourage people to ask specific questions (that can be answered by email if that person doesn’t have time) and to see what they can offer that person in return (or, preferably in advance!). But the “Five minute” rule is new to me, and absolutely fantastic!
    I will of course credit you when I next pass this on! 🙂

    Thanks, Natalie!

  8. Great advice and reminders thank you! You are so right that it’s all in the way you ask. So important. Also the old saying ‘if you never ask the answer is always no’. Like you, I have approached people I admire in the past not expecting a response and then have been so grateful to hear back from them. I find that often the most successful people have been the most generous and there’s really something valuable in that to take away. Again, all in the manner in which we approach people and offering them something in return as a thank you or way to support them. Really enjoy your videos thank you.

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