My New Hire Checklist For Busy Entrepreneurs

Natalie MacNeil Shares Tips on Hiring a New Team Member

Today I want to talk about a crazy-exciting, but sometimes really challenging, time for your business…

It’s that moment when you decide to hire a new team member. (Yay!)

(And if you think you’re not there yet, I’d encourage you to reconsider. To grow your business, you need at least one person who can help you with the day-to-day tasks while you work on bigger-picture ideas.)

Whether it’s the 1st or 15th person you’ve hired, though, it can be tough to bring a fresh face on board if you don’t have a new hire checklist or system in place for doing this. Honestly, I’ve heard from a lot you who’ve said this process can really drive you nuts.

In today’s episode of She Takes on the World TV, I’m going to share my simple ‘new hire checklist’ to help you with your onboarding process (and hopefully help you keep your sanity, too).

 

 

Click here to watch today’s episode: http://youtu.be/PUZgHLX7c5o

Here are 3 must-do’s for seamlessly bringing a new team member onboard:

 

  1. Create an operations manual (aka, “The Textbook On How To Run My Business”). This should be chock full of everything you can think of that keeps your business humming along: logos, color scheme for your brand, taglines, copy, processes, systems, and more! Make sure everyone on your team has a copy.
  2. Record training videos of the key tasks for your business. Jing is my go-to tool for this, and it’s super easy — just click one button to record your screen! While you record, you explain the steps you’re taking to complete the task. Then, pop the final recording file into Dropbox to share with your team.
  3. Hold a Q&A session with your new hires. Ask them to write down 25 questions they have for you — they might not actually have an entire 25 questions to ask, but it’ll give them the space to think about what details they might still be fuzzy on and let them see that you are approachable and open to helping them get crystal clear on their job duties.

Taking a little time to set up these systems shows your new hires that you’re here to help them and that you want to empower them to be the best team players that they can be for you.

And while we’re talking about teams, there’s one more piece of advice I’d like to share with you:

Don’t assume you’re always the one who knows best on how someone should do something.

I like to let my team members be part of creating the systems they’ll be using, and step away from any sort of dictating or micro-managing role.

The truth is, as an entrepreneur you can learn loads from your team if you let them rise to their fullest potential within your organization. (Click to tweet)

 

Keep that in mind – and congratulations on your new hire! I hope this is just the first of many people who will be joining your team to support you as you build your empire.

Now it’s your turn. Please leave a comment below and tell us: How do you onboard a new team member? Or, what is one role you need to fill in your business over the next 30 days? We can all learn from each other and I’d love to hear your ideas.

Cosmic hugs,

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3 thoughts on “My New Hire Checklist For Busy Entrepreneurs

  1. Hi,

    I’m so far away (maybe) from hiring someone. I’m going to put it in manifestation. I’d never considered it although I dream of a big business!

    I love the the 25 question idea. I’ll use that next time Im un boarding someone new. I do it in my day job quite a bit! I do agree with you that people need to be and feel creative. It’s amazing what comes up when you let them. It’s sad how seldom I see this!

    A few years ago the company I worked for at the time decided that everyone should come up with an improvement project! Wt first the initiative were name something with acronym std … That didn’t last! Lol!

    Anyways people were free to team up with anyone they wanted(900 people). They were assisted by a manager. More than 50 projects got done that year! More importantly it created a culture of empowerment. People were proud.

    For my part I took on a big project. . I pulled twelve people from 6 departments. We turned the onboarding process from more than three weeks to three days!!!! I feel proud just talking about it!

    I wrote more than what I intented. You just made me realize what kind of business I really want to create!

  2. I’d thought about setting up my SOP and video training (recently started using and loving Jing!) but I love the 25 questions idea. So simple and yet so important. When I was a regular worker I always had a million questions and would have loved to have been given the space to ask all of them.

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