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How Will You Outlive Your Life?

You probably became an entrepreneur because there is a part of the world you want to change somehow, whether in a small way or a big way.

Entrepreneur and Inventor Thomas Edison founded one of the largest companies in the world, General Electric, and gave us many things we use today like incandescent lights. He also helped build the modern media industry.

Entrepreneurs like Warren Buffett and Oprah Winfrey have billions of dollars as a result of building successful companies, but what they are driven by is using their money to make a difference and leave a legacy.

Your legacy doesn’t have to be on a grand scale like the aforementioned entrepreneurs either. Your product or service changing just one person’s life means you’ve had an impact.

I see entrepreneurship as a huge opportunity to contribute something meaningful to the world and change people’s lives through our work, and that’s what I want to talk about in today’s episode of She Takes on the World TV.

Watch the episode below (or click here):

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Now I want to hear from you! What kind of legacy do you want to create? Does legacy drive you at all as an entrepreneur?

6 thoughts on How Will You Outlive Your Life? Leave a reply

  1. Laura G. Jones

    I love this, Natalie! I’ve often asked myself about the legacy I’d want to leave. Ever since I was a little girl I knew I wanted to make a difference in the world, and wouldn’t settle for less when I started growing up and realized that conventional wisdom would have us believe differently.

    I hope to inspire and help people to connect with their intuition and follow their inner wisdom. My legacy would be to inspire a group of thinkers and doers to continue to challenge conventional rules, dream big, and follow their heart. Finally, I hope to do good and create a “domino effect” of giving, loving, and sharing.

    Great question and video, Natalie!

    Reply
  2. Kristina Brzezinski

    I love how you phrased it, Natalie: “What kinds of stories are you etching into the minds and hearts of other people?” I don’t care to have a legacy that “outlives” me, but since we etch stories into the minds and hearts of others whether we intend to or not, I want more stories to focus on my cheerfulness and and how I live from abundance, sharing my talents, time, friendship, and money with others. I’d also like my stories to include how I helped others to be generous and help those in their communities.

    Reply
  3. Dina Lynch Eisenberg

    You know, this isn’t such a gloomy topic. I see a legacy as being a hopeful and uplifting thing.

    I’m passionately committed to helping women see themselves as powerful and act that way. To use our gifts for communicating, collaborating and connection as the strengthens they truly are and grow our businesses.

    My legacy will be a generation of women entrepreneurs who never question their ability to be effective leaders who are both powerful and generous. Who take as much as they give and feel great about that.

    Reply
  4. Monica Niska

    Hi Natalie! I love this topic because it really helps to challenge day to day activities and initiatives and asks the question, “I am doing everything I possibly can today to make people’s lives better?” For me, the simple legacy I want to leave are the words, “She Inspired.” I want to leave a legacy of people behind me who were inspired and influenced by my life to push forward, expect better, and to truly seek out & fulfill their dreams and goals. I want to leave a team of business owners behind that are fulfilling their dreams, and inspiring others to do the same.

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  5. Nina Kaufman

    Great points about leaving a legacy, Natalie. There are a couple of ways we can do that: we can leave a legacy through how we touch people’s lives when we’re here; and we can continue our good work after we’re gone (or want to move on) through a company that has a life of its own. But I find that many women entrepreneurs are so stuck in the day-to-day of running their businesses that they don’t take a breath to see where their business legacy is taking them … and sadly, end up with companies that provide little free time, leverage, or value because it’s “all about them.” Shifting that approach to building your business–so that you CAN achieve personal and financial freedom through your company–is what I’ve strived to do in my VIP Day workshops (http://askthebusinesslawyer.com/vip-day) … and is part of the legacy I want to leave for women business owners.

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